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The serial interface is a two-way communications device meaning that it can send and receive data at the same time.

The speed in which the interface communicates is denoted by the ‘baud rate.’
ViewZ’s Public view monitor and LCD built in 4/8ch DVR operate at a baud rate of 9600.

The RS-232 standard imposes a cable length limit of 50 feet; however, this is usually ignored since a cable can be as long as 10000 feet at baud rates up to 192000 if you use a high quality, well shielded cable. The external environment has a large effect on lengths for unshielded cables. In electrically noisy environments, even very short cables can pick up stray signals. For Orion’s Public view monitor and LCD built in 4/8ch DVR, the following offers some reasonable guidelines for 24 gauge wire under typical conditions.

Baud Rate: 9600
Shielded Cable Length: 250
Un-shielded Cable Length: 100

RS232 is an industry standard communications interface between a PC computer and a peripheral device.

The RS232 interface is usually known as serial interface and is used to control a peripheral device, such as modems and display devices. The RS232 interface is sometimes called the RS232C interface. The RS232 standard requires peripheral devices to use a 25-pin or a 9-pin connector. ViewZ’s Public view monitors and LCD built in 4/8ch DVR use 9-pin connectors.

As EIA defines, the RS232 is used for connecting Data Transmission Equipment (DTE) and Data Communication Equipment (DCE).

Component video is a video signal that has been split into two or more component channels.

In popular use, it refers to a type of component analog video (CAV) information that is transmitted or stored as three separate signals. Component video can be contrasted with composite video (NTSC, PAL or SECAM) in which all the video information is combined into a single line level signal that is used in analog television. Like composite, component-video cables do not carry audio and are often paired with audio cables.

If you see the Check Signal or No Connection, Check Signal Cable message, it means either:

  1. If you have an analog monitor, that the signal cable connecting your video card to your monitor is loose or disconnected.
  2. If you have a digital monitor and you are using a DVI cable, that the DVI cable is loose or the monitor is set to analog.

To rectify the problem if you have an analog monitor, make sure that the signal cable is connected firmly to the monitor and to the video card.
To rectify the problem if you have a digital monitor, first make sure that the DVI cable is connected firmly to the monitor and to the video card.
If that does not solve the problem, press the source button on your monitor to make sure the monitor is in digital mode.

NOTE 1:
If you have a digital monitor, but you are using a standard D-sub cable to connect it to your computer and you are running the monitor in analog mode, use the instructions for analog monitors above.

NOTE 2:
If the signal cable is connected firmly to the monitor and the video card and you still see the Check Signal message, most likely the cable is defective. If this is the case, try replacing the cable.

EXT(RGB) is the name given to a kind of terminal or jack that is available on some multi-purpose VIEWZ monitors.

The EXT(RGB) jack or connection terminal is actually a 21 pin SCART RGB video jack that is compatible with SCART plugs and connectors. SCART is found mainly in Europe where it is used on video devices compatible with the PAL video standard.

RGB, by the way, stands for red, green, blue.

ViewZ LCD monitors terminate video at 75 Ω (ohms)

There are two general kinds of LCD displays, Passive Matrix and Active Matrix.

Essentially, passive Matrix LCD monitors are made by putting a layer of liquid crystal dots over a cross-crossing grid of wires backed by a fluorescent backlight. In a Passive Matrix display, current is applied to the wire intersections.

The current causes the liquid crystal dots at that point to untwist (turn on) and allow light to pass through.

The image that occurs is maintained by applying the current to the intersections at a set refresh rate and depends upon the ability of the liquid crystal to stay untwisted between refreshes.

Passive Matrix LCD displays have slow response times and tend to display fuzzy images that lack good contrast and brightness.

Active Matrix LCD monitors, in contrast, have a cross-crossing matrix of thin film transistors (TFT) instead of a matrix of wires. TFTs are basically very small, very thin transistors and capacitors.

In an Active Matrix LCD monitor, the current is applied to the capacitors located at the row and column intersections.

The current at the intersection causes the liquid crystal to untwist and the capacitor retains the charge, actively keeping the crystal untwisted, until the next refresh cycle. The transistors control the amount of current going to the liquid crystal and the capacitor, thereby actively controlling the amount of untwisting.

Active Matrix LCD displays have much faster response times, clearer, brighter images, and much greater contrast than Passive Matrix displays.

The contrast ratio indicates the difference in light intensity measured in cd/m2 (candelas per square meter) between the brightest white on a monitor screen and the darkest black.

It is calculated by subtracting the value of the darkest black from the brightest white, then dividing the result by the darkest dark (Brightest – Darkest/Darkest). Results are typically shown in the following format: 400:1.
Generally, better monitors have higher contrast ratios.

NOTE:
Light intensity per unit of area is also known as luminance.

Flat panel is a reference to the depth of LCD monitors, especially compared to CRT monitors, and to the fact that the viewing surface of any LCD monitor is flat. LCD monitors of all screen sizes are only a few inches thick. CRT monitors of any size are considerably thicker, in most cases twelve to sixteen inches, and, for large screen CRT monitors, even more. See the comparison of an LCD flat panel monitor (on the left) and a CRT monitor (on the right) below.

The following VIEWZ monitors offer 4K resolution of 3840 by 2160 :

VZ-43/55/65UHD – Quad Input 4K LED Monitor

VZ-75/86/98IBX – Large 4K LED Monitor with Media Player

VZ-75/86/98IBX-T – Interactive Large 4K LED Monitor

Cd/m2 – Candelas per square meter. A candela is a measure of luminous intensity.

Cd/m2 – A measure of luminous intensity per square meter, a quality also called luminance.

The higher the cd/m2, the brighter the luminous object.

Consequently, a monitor rated at 300 cd/m2, will look brighter than a monitor rated at 250 cd/m2.

sRGB – Standard Red Green Blue. The color standard that defines the standard combinations and luminance values of the red, green, and blue light that make up the colors used by most CRT monitors, LCD monitors, scanners, printers, and digital cameras.

A multimedia monitor can be used as either a computer monitor or a television.

Typically, a multimedia monitor has connections for a computer, cable television, a VCR, and a DVD player. Some multimedia monitors have built-in television tuners.

Others do not have built-in tuners and can only be used to watch TV broadcasts if they are attached to a cable box or set-top-box.

The standard pin assignments and signal connections for a 15 pin D-sub monitor connector (15 pin video SVGA connector) are listed in the chart below:

Signal Connections and Pin Assignments

PINSeparate H/VComposite H/V Sync on green
1RedRedRed
2GreenGreenGreen + H/V sync
3BlueBlueBlue
4GNDGNDGND
5GND (DDC Return)GND (DDC Return)GND (DDC Return)
6GND-RedGND-RedGND-Red
7GND-GreenGND-GreenGND-Green
8GND-BlueGND-BlueGND-Blue
9No ConnectionNo ConnectionNo Connection
10GND Sync/Self TestGND Sync/Self TestGND Sync/Self Test
11GNDGNDGND
12DDC DataDDC DataDDC Data
13Horizontal SyncH/V SyncNot Used
14Vertical SyncNot UsedNot Used
15DDC ClockDDC ClockDDC Clock
A dual hinged monitor has one hinge at the bottom of the stand where the stand attaches to the base and another hinge at the top of the stand where the stand attaches to the monitor. The bottom hinge lets you move the monitor screen up and down. The top hinge lets you tilt the screen back and forth.

If your monitor keeps displaying the Blue Screen of Death (BSOD), you should run a self-test on the monitor to see

If your LCD monitor display has no color, very light color, or the color is distorted, try the following:

– Unplug the cable connecting your monitor to your DVR or CCTV Camera and make sure that the plugs on either end do not have a bent pin.

NOTE:
– If a pin is bent, use a needle nose pliers to very gently straighten the pin or, if the pin is severely damaged, replace the cable.

Replug the cable at both ends and make sure that the plugs are securely connected to the back of your monitor and to your DVR or CCTV Camera.

Test your monitor. If the problem remains after you have confirmed that there are no bent pins and you have made sure the signal cable is connected securely replace your current signal cable with another cable.

– If the suggestions above do not resolve the color problem, try resetting the color through the OSD (on screen display) menu.

To reset the color on most ViewZ LCD monitors, follow these steps:

  1. Press the Menu button on your monitor. The OSD appears.
  2. Press the Up, down, left and right arrows Adjust button to cycle through the menu until the Reset menu appears. One of the selections on the reset menu should be Color Reset.
  3. Press the Menu button again to select the Reset menu or function menu.
  4. Press the Up, down, left and right arrows Adjust button to temperature Color Reset.
  5. Press the Menu button to select Color Reset.
  6. Press the “select” Adjust button to select Yes. The screen may flash as the monitor resets the color.
  7. Press the Exit button on the monitor three times to exit the OSD.

NOTE:
The procedure above works for most ViewZ LCD monitors. It may not work for yours.
For exact instructions, see you user’s manual. If you don’t have your user’s manual on hand.
If your problem is not resolved after you have reset the color, try pushing the Auto Adjust button on your monitor.
If your problem is not resolved after you have pushed the Auto Adjust button, you should run a monitor self-test to check whether your monitor is functioning properly.

To run the self test, follow these steps:

  1. Turn off both your computer, another video equipment and the monitor.
  2. Unplug the video cable from the back of the computer.
  3. Turn on the monitor. Depending on your monitor, one of the Check Signal Cable figures shown below appears.

NOTE:
While in the Self-Test mode, the monitor’s LED power indicator remains green and the Check Signal Cable figure moves around on the screen.

If no Check Signal Cable figure appears, there is a problem with your monitor.

If you see the second Check Signal figure, and one of the colored squares within it (as shown above) does not appear, there is a problem with your monitor. If you see one of the Check Signal Cable figures as they appear above, your monitor is functioning properly.

The problem you are having is probably being caused by your video controller, video cable, video card, video drivers, or computer system.

If you did not see a Check Signal Cable figure or a colored square did not appear, your monitor needs servicing.

To get sound from the speakers in your monitor you must do two things:

  1. Connect the audio out jack on your computer to the audio or speaker in jack on your monitor.
  2. Make sure that the Windows Volume Control dialog is set correctly.

To connect the audio out jack on your computer to the audio or speaker in jack on your monitor, follow the directions in your monitor’s user’s manual.

To set the Windows Volume Control dialog, follow these steps:

  1. Turn on your computer and monitor and bring up the Windows desktop.
  2. Double click the Loudspeaker icon on the lower right side of your monitor screen. The Volume Control dialog appears.
  3. Click Options>Properties. The Properties dialog appears.
  4. Click Playback.
  5. Make sure that all the volume controls that control the various inputs you use (Volume Control, Wave, SW Synth, CD Player, Line In, etc. ) are checked. Click OK when done.
  6. On the Volume Control dialog, use your mouse to slide all the sliders of the inputs you use to at least the half way point.
  7. Make sure none of the Mute boxes of the inputs you use have been checked.
  8. Close the Volume Control dialog.If no Check Signal Cable figure appears, there is a problem with your monitor.

Problems with screen proportions, screen size, blurry graphics, and blurry text can often be resolved by setting a monitor to its native resolution and optimum refresh rate. The optimum refresh rate for all VIEWZ LCD monitors is 60 Hz. The optimum resolution for LCD monitors varies by size. The chart below shows the native (optimum) resolution for VIEWZ LCD monitors by size.

Monitor Size Optimum Resolution
15 to 16 inches: 1024×768
17 to 19 inches: 1280×1024
20 to 32 inches: 1600 x 1200

(1) How To Change the Refresh Rate?
To set the refresh rate in Windows 98, ME, 2000, or XP, follow these steps:

  1. Click the Start button, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
  2. In the Control Panel window, double-click the Display icon.
  3. In the Display Properties window, click the Settings tab.
  4. On the Settings tab, click Advanced.
  5. On the Advanced tab, click the Monitor tab.
  6. On the Monitor tab, click the Refresh Frequency field.
  7. Select the correct refresh rate from the drop down list.
  8. Click OK on the Monitor tab and again on the Display Properties dialog.

(2) How To Change the Resolution?
To change the display resolution in Windows 98, ME, 2000, or XP to the native (optimum) resolution, follow these steps:

  1. Click the Start button, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
  2. In the Control Panel window, double-click the Display icon.
  3. In the Display Properties window, click the Settings tab.
  4. On the Settings tab, drag the Screen Area slider to the native resolution for your monitor.
  5. Click the OK button.
  6. In the Monitor Settings box, click the Yes button.

NOTE:
If you have an LCD monitor, and the procedures above do not resolve your problem, you can try pressing the Auto Adjust button on your monitor to adjust the picture.

To change the language of your On Screen Display (OSD) Menu, follow these steps:

  1. Turn on your monitor and computer.
  2. Press the Menu button on your monitor. The OSD Menu appears.
  3. Press the arrow Adjust button on your monitor repeatedly to cycle through the OSD Menu screens. Stop when the Language screen appears.
  4. Press the Menu button to select the Language screen.
  5. Press the arrow or select Adjust button on your monitor repeatedly to highlight a language.
  6. Press the Exit or Menu button on your monitor to select the language you highlighted.
  7. Press the Exit or Menu button again to exit the Menu.

IMPORTANT:
The procedure above works for most VIEWZ LCD monitors. It may not work for yours. For exact instructions on how to select a language, see your user’s manual.

To connect your monitor to your DVR (or another PC), follow these steps:

  1. Turn both the monitor and the DVR (or another PC) off.
  2. Using the appropriate cable, connect either.
  3. The 15 pin D-sub out port on the DVR(or another PC) to the 15 pin D-sub in port on your monitor.
  4. The DVI out port on your DVR(or another PC) to the DVI in port on your monitor
  5. Important: Connect one or the other. Do not connect both.
  6. Turn on your monitor and DVR (or another PC).
  7. Monitor display on, DVR (or another PC) display off.
  8. Both monitor display and DVR (or another PC) display on.
  9. Monitor display off, DVR (or another PC) display on.

Since a 15 inch LCD display contains 2,359,296 pixels, a 19 inch LCD display contains 3,932,160 pixels, and a 24 inch LCD display contains 6,912,000 pixels, having a few ``bad`` pixels is not considered a defect.

It is rare for a monitor to ship with or develop bad pixels.

If or when a bad pixel occurs, it is not an indication that more will occur. It is usually a solitary incident.

A pixel may be Stuck On or Stuck Off.

The minimum number of defective pixels we allow before we will replace an in warranty monitor is as follows:

For 15″ Monitor – 7 or more bad pixels
For 17″ and 19″ Monitors – 10 or more bad pixels
For 21″ and 24″ Monitors – 17 or more bad pixels.

If your monitor keeps displaying the Blue Screen of Death (BSOD), you should run a self-test on the monitor to see

if th – To run a self test, follow these steps:

  1. Turn off both your computer(DVR) and the monitor.
  2. Unplug the video cable from the back of the computer.
  3. Turn on the monitor. Depending on your monitor, one of the Check Signal Cable figures shown below appears.

NOTE:
While in the Self-Test mode, the monitor’s LED power indicator remains green and the Check Signal Cable figure moves around on the screen.

If no Check Signal Cable figure appears, there is a problem with your monitor.

If you see the Check Signal figure, and one of the colored squares within it (as shown above) does not appear, there is a problem with your monitor.

If you see the ‘Check Signal Cable’ figures as they appear above, your monitor is functioning properly.

The BSOD problem you are having is probably being caused by your video controller, video card, video drivers, or computer system.

If you did not see a ‘Check Signal Cable’ figure or a colored square did not appear, your monitor needs servicing. To arrange service.

All current Orion LCD security monitors are capable of displaying at 1280x1024.

If you can not adjust your Orion LCD monitor to 1280×1024, first make sure that your video card is capable of displaying at that resolution. Some cards can not. After you have confirmed that your video card can display at 1280×1024, set the refresh rate of your monitor to 60 Hz, and then try setting the resolution to 1280×1024.

If your remote control is not functioning properly, try the following:

  1. If your monitor is in the same room with a TV or other large electronic device, move the monitor as far away from the device as possible or remove the device from the room. Then, try using the remote control.
  2. If there is a fluorescent or neon light on in the vicinity, turn it off. Then, try using the remote control.
  3. Remove the batteries and hold down the POWER button for 1 minute. Insert fresh batteries and try using the remote control again.
  4. If this does not solve your problem, remove the batteries again and press and release each button on the remote control once, then repeat. Re-insert the batteries and try operating your monitor again.

If none of the above suggestions work, you will need to replace the remote.

If your standard cable channels are fuzzy or blurry on your LCD monitor when you watch them in full screen mode, unfortunately there is little you can do about it.

The signal you are getting from your cable company is a low definition 480i signal with a resolution of approximately 640 by 480. Your LDC monitor is a high definition monitor with an optimum resolution of 1024 by 720, 1280 by 1024, or 1920 by 1200, depending on the monitor. It is this mismatch between the cable signal resolution and the monitor resolution that causes the problem.

Note that if you have PIP (picture in picture), you can put the TV picture into the Pip window and get a clearer picture.